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Shipwrecks, Diving and Underwater
Archaeology books.

 

A selection of books, most of which are also displayed in other pages, covering maritime disasters, shipwrecks, underwater archaeology and childrens books - some fiction covering these subjects.

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The wreck of the Wager, one of the vessels composing Anson's expedition in 1740 against the Spanish settlements of South America, is one of the most famous stories of the British Navy. Narratives of The Hon. John Byron and of his fellow midshipman Isaac Morris. Published circa 1905
The Log of the Flying Fish: A Story of Aerial and Submarine Peril and Adventure by Harry Collingwood. Illustrated in b&w by Gordon Browne Published before 1910 by Blackie and Son, London. This book was one of the first science fiction genre to be published and has since been reprinted as an eBook and a paperback. This particular copy is probably only in GOOD condition.
The White Star Liner Atlantic sailing in 1837 from Liverpool for New York when she ran full speed onto the rocky coast of Nova Scotia drowning 562 people. C. H. Milsom deduces from a long-forgotten report of a British Government investigation that the ship was poorly managed and had no need to approach Halifax for coal.
A HISTORY OF SEAFARING BASED ON UNDERWATER ARCHAEOLOGY has chapters on Greek, Etruscan and Phoenician ships and shipping, the Romans on the sea, Greek and Roman harbour-works, ships of the Roman period and after in Britain, the Byzantine maritime world, Scandinavian ships up to the time of the Vikings, and the ships of medieval and Renaissance Italy. Later chapters describe the influence of British naval strategy on ship design, the traders and privateers who plied the Atlantic from the end of the fifteenth century to the middle of the eighteenth, and how the great water-ways opened the New World.
Castaway & Wrecked, ed. Rex Cowan: The coasts of Scilly and Cornwall have long been a hazard to ships and those who sail in them, but it was not till the latter half of the nineteenth century that the moving details of shipwrecks and their aftermath were recorded for posterity. This book brings together the superb photographs of the Gibson family of Scilly and Penzance, many of them previously unpublished, and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events depicted in them.
PERIL OF THE SEA by J. G. Lockhart (Nautilus Library): A book of shipwrecks and escapes beginning with the WHITE SHIP and ending with the TITANIC. Each Incident has its own chapter; Occum Chamnan, HMS Phœnix, Royal George, Rothsay Castle and the Birkenhead.
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A HISTORY OF SHIPWRECKS AND DISASTERS AT SEA FROM THE MOST AUTHENTIC SOURCES in two volumes Constable's Miscellany Volume 78 Volume I: THE NORTHERN AND POLAR SEA Constable's Miscellany Volume 79 Volume II: THE ATLANTIC AND SOUTHERN SEAS by Richard Sampson. Published in 1833 by Whittaker, Treacher & Co., London and Waugh & Innes, Edinburgh
Stars Beneath the Sea by Trevor Norton: This is the story of some of the brave, brilliant and sometimes barmy men who 'invented' diving. It is the story of explosive tempers and exploding teeth, of how to juggle live hand grenades and steer a giant rubber octopus.
The Wreck of the Batavia by Simon Lees: In 1629, the ship Batavia, pride of the Dutch East India Company, was wrecked on the edge of a coral archipelago, some fifty nautical miles from the Australian continent. Most of the people on board survived the wreck, only to become victims of a visionary psychopath who, with the help of a dozen mutineers, organised a methodical massacre of the hapless community awaiting rescue. Joe Haberstroh in his intriguing book, FATAL DEPTH, tells how the Andrea Doria sank and the dangers of diving to that depth. He was present during the summers of 1990 and 1999 when three elite divers lost their lives, all on separate dives from the 65-foot diving tender Seeker
The wreck of the Croatian Barque Stefano off the North West Cape of Australia in 1875.Ten men struggled ashore, their plight was acute. Two teenagers Miho Baccich and Ivan Jurich, themselves driven to cannibalism, were rescued by aborigines, members of a nomadic tribe whose generosity and compassion saved their lives. Eventually a pearling ship turned toward shore in a storm and they were discovered
At seventeen Tony Groom joined the Royal Navy. As a member of the Fleet  
             Clearance Diving Team, he found himself diving for mines, dealing with unexploded bombs and being shot at in the Falklands War. He left the Navy in 1985, and has since travelled the world as a commercial diver.
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His vessel crippled in a violent tropical torm, Bas Stallard is alone on a vast ocean with little hope of rescue. As he struggles to save the slowly sinking cutter, Mapu, he finds moments to ponder over a stirring past life, crammed with action and adventure on the high seas.
In "TALL SHIP DOWN" Dan Parrott, a maritime expert, re-creates  the final voyages of the Pamir, Albatross, Marques, Pride of Baltimore, and  Maria Asumpta. Parrott dissects the circumstances of loss from forensic  evidence, expert testimony, survivors’ memories, and his own considerable experience.
THE WRECKERS:A story of killing seas, false lights and plundered ships by BELLA BATHURST illuminates the darker side of Britain's maritime history as she works her way around the coastal ares of Britain.
Commander Ohrelius has written a fascinating account of Vasa, the ill-fate royal ship whose maiden voyage in 1628 lasted little more than two hours, and was followed by 330 years of silence at the bottom of the waters of Stockholm harbour.– a strange fate for a man-of war built to maintain Sweden’s power in the Baltic against the threatened attack by the Hapsburg Empire. This seventeenth-century warship is unique, the best preserved so far discovered to be definitely identifiable, and there is a great deal to be learned from her. CLICK TO GO TO PAGE!!
The Wreck of the Memphis The Wreck of the Memphis by CAPT EDWARD L. BEACH USN: One of the largest battle cruisers ever built by the United States Navy, the Memphis, was utterly wrecked in one of the worst catastrophes ever recorded in naval history. Now, in the swift, vivid prose which distinguished his best-selling book RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP, Captain Beach tells the full story of the Memphis, of the man (his father) who commanded her, and of the court- martial which shattered a brilliant naval career.
IN PERIL ON THE SEA- Marine Votive Paintings in the Maltese Islands by A. H. J. Prins, Emeritus professor of Anthropology at the University of Groningen with an appendix of line drawings of Maltese ships by Joseph Muscat.
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Admiral Gordon Campbell, author of ‘My Mystery Ships’, in ‘Abandon Ship’ recounts the loss of sailing warships in the far flung corners of the world where men struggled to survive: Antelope, HMS Alceste, Prosperine, St. George and Defence. The author’s personal experience of HMS Flora’s 1903 stranding off Denham Island, Vancouver is mentioned.
In 1836, the barque Stirling Castle was wrecked on the Great Barrier Reef. Captured by aborigines with cannibalistic tendencies, Captain Fraser and his wife were stripped naked and driven into the bush. Fraser was then murdered and his wife, a lady of genteel upbringing, was tortured  and made to perform humiliating tasks as the slave of the tribe.
Painstakingly researched by Gerald Bowman and told for the first time in this biography is the astounding story of what is regarded as the greatest achievement in the history of marine salvage – the raising of the Scuttled German Fleet at Scapa Flow by Ernest Cox who bought the sunken fleet from the Admiralty after WWI.
Treasure of the Atocha by R. Duncan Mathewson III tells the story of the agonizingly long search for the wreck, began by Mel Fisher, both through historical records and along the Florida coast and describes the sheer joy of uncovering one of the world’s greatest treasure troves
For around four thousand years the Isle of Wight has witnessed the destruction of untold numbers of vessels along its shores, and the deaths of hundreds of mariners. The sheer volume of shipwrecks is staggering. The Admiralty has found 4,000 wrecks in the area covered by the chart ‘Solent Approaches’..
TITANIC and the CALIFORNIAN: Thomas B. Williams unearthed the required ‘new and important evidence’ which prompted the British Government to re-open the case surrounding Captain Lord and the Californian and effectively proved that the much maligned captain and his ship could not have been the mystery ship seen from the decks of the doomed Titanic.
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Shipwrecks of the Orkney, Shetland and Pentland Firth complete with 9 pages of charts to show the positions of the selection of the wrecks described by David M. Ferguson.
The waters around the Isle of Wight are some of the busiest in Europe. Ken Phillips unearths the details of many lesser known ships whose dramatic ends are worth recording. He looks into the causes of the wrecks, often tragically within reach of shelter and safety, and their impact on the people who lived along the shores. Shipwrecks Around the Isles of Scilly contains 64 glossy pages of black and white photographs, many full page, from the renowned Gibson Family Collection. They show different types of vessels wrecked from 1871 to 1979. 
Using Norddeutscher Lloyd records and  Gustaf Erikson’s papers this book tells the full story of the steel, four-masted barque Herzogin Cecilie, from her launch in 1902 as a cargo carrying cadet ship, Gustaf Erikson’s ownership and sheds new light on her tragic demise on the Devon coast in 1936.
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