Victorian Army 1859-1899

THE VICTORIAN ARMY AT HOME

The Recruitment and Terms and Conditions of the British Regular 1859-1899

THE VICTORIAN ARMY AT HOME 1859-1899 by Alan Ramsay Skelly: This small icon is used elsewhere in my site as a link to this page!

First published in 1977 by McGill-Queen's University Press, Montreal and Croom Helm Ltd., London

This is the Croom Helm Ltd. 1st. edition.

ISBN: 0 85664 335 1

This copy is Hardcover


This book is an enquiry in the world of one of Victorian Britain’s most neglected and misunderstood characters – the regular soldier. Uncovering the realities of conditions within the service and tracing the effect of the changes to the service between the fall of Sebastopol and the outbreak of war in South Africa.


Book's condition and details:

Black 'cloth' bound book with bright gilt title to spine - No inscriptions - pages and contents tight, clean and bright - a mimimum of shelf wear after more than thirty years - condition at least VERY GOOD PLUS. Dust wrapper - un-price clipped - clean - a little shelf wear but at the least in VERY GOOD PLUS condition.
A very nice copy - especially for its age!

Royal Mail prices for various destinations.
Prices correct from May 2015.
U.K. Included in price
Europe £6.85
World Zones 1 £10.30
World Zones 2 £11.15

ISBN: 0 7190 2659 8

366 pages. 142 mm. x 223 mmm. x 26 mm.

Weight unwrapped 610 grams

Weight wrapped for postage < 750 grams.

THE VICTORIAN ARMY AT HOME 1859-1899 by Alan Ramsay Skelly: A small flash photograph intended to show the general appearance but unfortunately the clossy surface has created highlights!

Price: £28.00 including U.K. postage.
For postage to other countries see table!

Dust Wrapper blurbs:

THE VICTORIAN ARMY AT HOME
The Recruitment and Terms and Conditions of the British Regular 1868-1902

This book is an enquiry in the world of one of Victorian Britain’s most neglected and misunderstood characters – the regular soldier. Commonly the victim of jokes and discrimination, but the pet of both music hall and polite society whenever trouble was afoot, the soldier lived in a world far removed in many respects from the mainstream of society. Yet he as much as anyone carried the initial burden of Empire. Often the leading edge of British civilisation and for many peoples the personification of European society, it was in his footsteps that British rule, customs and language were spread and that commerce flourished. This important study sheds new light on the man in the ranks – who was he, what was he like, and why.

An exhaustive use of new and varied sources has made it possible to uncover the realities of conditions within the service and to trace the effect of the changes introduced between the fall of Sebastopol and the outbreak of war in South Africa.

Recruitment, one of the most important concerns of the period, is closely examined. Always a contentious issue, manpower needs influenced the course of reform and served as an indicator of success by measuring the army’s appeal to the labour market. Widely accepted beliefs about the background and origins of the men in the ranks and therefore the success of related reforms are questioned in this study and the need revision shown. This book represents an even-handed treatment of the subject and is one that will prove absorbing reading.