World War I - Palestine - Egypt
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FORGOTTEN SOLDIERS

OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR by David R. Woodward

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FORGOTTEN SOLDIERS

A scanned image of 'Forgotten Soldiers' in an attempt to show the general appearance of the front jacket cover.
In Forgotten Soldiers using personal accounts from the diaries and letters of British soldiers who served in the First World War, David Woodward describes the experience of combat in Egypt and Palestine painting a vivid picture of life for the British Tommy in conditions vastly different from the Western Front.

Published by Tempus Publishing Limited, Stroud, UK
This edition published by arrangement with the University of Kentucky in 2006
Edition: 1st. UK
ISBN: 0752438549
Hardback

BOOK CONDITION etc.:

A black cloth bound book with gilt lettering to the spine in FINE (as new) condition in a FINE (as new) condition dust wrapper.

318 pages; 167 mm. x 240 mm. x 30 mm. weight unwrapped 623 grams - weight wrapped for postage 760 grams.

PRICE (GBP) £11.50 plus postage - Included for UK.


BACK FLAP BLURBS:

We know a lot about Lawrence of Arabia but what do we know of the common soldier who fought on the Middle Eastern Front?

Royal Mail prices for various destinations.
Prices correct from May 2015.
U.K. Included in price
Europe £8.26
World Zones 1 £12.45
World Zones 2 £12.90

Using personal accounts from the diaries and letters of British soldiers who served in the First World War, David Woodward describes the experiences of combat in Egypt and Palestine. Drawing upon unpublished records in the Imperial War Museum,

A small photograph of David R. Woodwar's 'Forgotten Soldiers' showing the condition and general appearance!

Forgotten Soldiers of the First World War paints a vivid picture of life for the British Tommy in conditions vastly different from Western Front, where heat, sand storms and insects proved just as deadly as the enemy.

QUOTES FROM THE PREFACE

“The soldier on the Western Front envied and in fact felt intensely hostile to his opposite number in Egypt, who in his opinion, was having a “cushy” time basking in the warm sunshine and being fanned to sleep by lovely houris.”
“I have been told that it was at one time the vogue in England to consider the soldiers, whom fate and the War Office had condemned to serve in Egypt, only one degree better than a conscientious objector”