Military Waterloo autobiography

FIT FOR SERVICE

The Training of the British Army 1715-1795

FIT FOR SERVICE-The Training of the British Army 1715-1795: This small icon is used elsewhere in my site as a link to this page!

First published in 1991 by Oxford University Press Inc. New York

This 2nd. edition published by Oxford University Press for Sandpiper Books Ltd. in 2000

ISBN: 0 19 822647 0

This copy is Hardcover


A study of the army’s lack of a peacetime and wartime training regimen in the period between the Duke of Marlborough’s campaigns and the reforms associated with the Duke of York due to preoccupations of the army with civil matters.


Book's condition and details:

Black 'cloth' bound book with bright gilt title to spine - No inscriptions - pages and contents as new - a mimimum of shelf wear so condition NEAR FINE. Dust wrapper - un-price clipped - also NEAR FINE condition. A very nice copy!

Royal Mail prices for various destinations.
Prices correct from May 2015.
U.K. Included in price
Europe £8.26
World Zones 1 £12.95
World Zones 2 £13.90

ISBN: 0198226470

459 pages. 145 mm. x 225 mmm. x 30 mm.

Weight unwrapped 687 grams

Weight wrapped for postage > 750 grams.

FIT FOR SERVICE -The Training of the British Army 1715-1795: A small photograph intended to show the general appearance!

Price: £50.00 including U.K. postage.
For postage to other countries see table!

Dust Wrapper blurbs:

FIT FOR SERVICE
Training of the British Army 1715-1795

In this study of the army’s peacetime and wartime training regimen in the period between the Duke of Marlborough’s campaigns and the reforms associated with the Duke of York, J. A. Houlding looks primarily at the various circumstances that contributed to such a lack of preparedness that one officer considered the troops ‘in imminent danger of being cut to pieces in our first encounter’.

In discussion of poor training of the eighteenth-century army the usual suspects are the purchased commissions system and lack of drill regulations.

Houlding challenges that argument, analysing a mass of War Office documents including Marching Orders, Inspection Returns and Drill books, to present a detailed account of the timetable of peacetime service and the preoccupations of the army with civil matters which, he concludes, left it short of the time and opportunity for training.