Army 1558-1945

THE AMATEUR MILITARY TRADITION 1558-1945

by Ian F. W. Beckett

The Amateur Military Tradition by Ian F. W. Beckett: The small image is used elsewhere in my site as a link to this page

First published in 1991 by Manchester University Press

This is the 1st. edition.

ISBN: 0 7190 2912 0

This copy is Hardcover


Ian Beckett in THE AMATEUR MILITARY TRADITION revaluates the impact of the auxiliaries on British culture and society between the mid-sixteenth century to the present day. The author argues that these forces, rather than the regular army, have provided an essential point of contact between army and society.


Book's condition and details:

Red 'cloth' bound book with bright lettering to spine - No inscriptions - pages and contents as new - obviously unread - a mimimum of shelf wear after 24 years - so condition FINE. Dust wrapper - un-price clipped - also FINE condition. A very nice perfect copy - ‘As New’!

340 pages. 145 mm. x 220 mmm. x 22 mm.

Weight unwrapped 495 grams

Weight wrapped for postage < 750 grams.

Price: £30.00 including U.K. postage.
For postage to other countries see table!

Dust Wrapper blurbs:

The Amateur Military Tradition by Ian F. W. Beckett: The small image is used elsewhere in my site as a link to this page

THE LATE VICTORIAN ARMY
1868-1902

In this first full length study of the amateur military tradition in Britain, Ian Beckett presents a comprehensive and scholarly overview of the development of the auxiliary forces from the mid-sixteenth century to the present day. Revaluating the impact of the auxiliaries on British culture and society, the author argues that these forces, rather than the regular army, have provided an essential point of contact between army and society.

Traditionally, standing armies In Britain have been viewed with considerable distrust and preference for amateur and temporary soldiers has served to heighten the importance of auxiliary forces in defence against both foreign invasion and domestic disorder. In this book, Ian Beckett traces the history of the auxiliary forces from the early evolution of a national militia through to the more systematic organisation of local auxiliaries and shows how the forces have continuously reflected and transmitted traditional attitudes towards military participation in Britain. Focusing on the development of such forces as the Militia, Yeomanry, volunteers, territorials and home guard, the author also conveys the continuity in their roles and the ubiquity of their presence in local society, highlighting not only their military purpose, but also their function as tools of social control and law-keeping.

This book will be essential reading for military historians and their students and will also interest social historians and any general reader concerned with the interaction between army and society.