Salvaging the Scuttled German Navy at Scapa Flow

THE MAN WHO BOUGHT A NAVY

The Story of the World's Greatest Salvage Achievement at Scapa Flow

by Gerald Bowman

The Man Who Bought a Navy by Gerald Bowman: The small scanned image is used elsewhere in my site as a link to this page

The Story of the World's Greatest Salvage Achievement at Scapa Flow

First published in 1964 by George G. Harrap, London; this is the second (2002) reprint published by Peter Rowlands and Stephen Birchall,  London

This is the 2nd. second reprint with aditional information.

ISBN: n/a

Illustrated laminated board bound book with a minute mark on the front board on this otherwise immaculate book - no inscriptions - unread -pages pristine - no dust wrapper as published - Condition at least NEAR FINE - an extremely nice copy.


Painstakingly researched by Gerald Bowman and told for the first time in this biography is the astounding story of what is regarded as the greatest achievement in the history of marine salvage – the raising of the Scuttled German Fleet at Scapa Flow by Ernest Cox who bought the sunken fleet from the Admiralty after WWI.


Book's condition and details:

A black cloth bound book with gilt lettering to the spine in NEAR FINE condition in a NEAR FINE unclipped dust jacket - In excellent condition, clean and bright without inscriptions or marks.

249 pages. 160 mm. x 240 mmm. x 22 mm.

Weight unwrapped 704 grams

Weight wrapped for postage  >1000 grams.

Price: £38:00 including U.K. postage. Overseas buyers please ask for quote!

Back Cover blurbs:

The Man Who Bought a Navy by Gerald Bowman: A mobile phone photograph, although low resolution, is intended to show the general appearance and condition of the book!

The Man Who Bought a Navy

Pieced together after much research and told for the first time in this biography is the astounding story of what is regarded as the greatest achievement in the history of marine salvage – the raising of the German Fleet at Scapa Flow. When the Germans sank their surrendered navy at Scapa Flow after the First World War, top salvage experts were agreed that the work of recovering the ships was near impossible.

Engineer Ernest Cox was one man who defied their prediction. In 1924 he decided to buy the scuttled fleet from the Admiralty, gambling his entire personal fortune on the colossal task of raising the German ships. Cox was a natural-born engineering genius, and though he had never before salvaged even a rowing boat, the fanatical energy and tireless concentration with which he worked during the next eight years achieved staggering results. His methods were unorthodox. He lifted ships that were lying upside-down, turned them the right way up, and pumped them dry. When this was impossible, he had patches clamped over every opening in the capsized hulls and pumped compressed air into them until they rose to the surface.

Inevitably, there were disasters. Oil vapour explosions occurred in which men were working over 60 feet below the surface; chains and heavy gear broke; re-floated ships sank suddenly when the corroded bulkheads collapsed. Yet Cox not only weathered these hazards but also succeeded in raising six vessels in fourteen days, a record, and recovered the battleship Hindenberg, the biggest ship ever raised in history.