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Miscellaneous and non-naval books.
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The Discovery of
North America
1630-1776

by
W. P. CUMMING, S. E. HILLIER D B QUINN AND GLYNDWR WILLIAMS
1971, Published by ELEK BOOKS LIMITED, London
ISBN 0 236 17639 0
272 pages 235mm. x 308mm. x 44mm. Weight unwrapped 2.22 kilo.

A quarto sized black cloth bound book with gilt lettering to spine and front board in at least VERY GOOD PLUS condition with a minimum of shelf wear. No inscriptions. Page block, illustrated throughout with 370 plates of which 75 are in full colour, is clean, tight and bright. In a complete VERY GOOD PLUS dust wrapper.

 

Jacket flap blurb

The Discovery of North America
W. P. CUMMING, R.A. SKELTON, AND D.B. QUINN

This volume presents the discovery and exploration of the North American continent, from the earliest references down to the first permanent settlements, as described by the explorers themselves and delineated by contemporary Europeans. The vivid narratives of those who first sailed along its coasts, penetrated the unknown interior with its primeval forests, wide rivers, and hostile inhabitants, man and beast, are richly supplemented by the drawings of the explorers and by the conceptions of the land which they brought back to European mapmakers and artists.
The geographical misconceptions of the discoverers, strange and absurd as they seem to us now, were exciting, stimulating, and often disastrous to the adventurers who came to seek wealth or freedom or glory in the new land.

The illustrations are taken from rare contemporary records, manuscript and engraved maps, and original paintings of the period. Each section of the volume has an introductory historical essay which binds together the original narratives and the accompanying illustrations: the possible pre-Columbian explorations, the emerging knowledge of the east coast from Cabot to Cartier, the Spanish penetration of the southern interior and discoveries along the west coast, the sixteenth-century attempts at colonization, the search for a North-west Passage, and the beginnings of permanent settlement in the early seventeenth century.

Among the early explorers, some were officially appointed to make discoveries: John Cabot, who held a patent for his first voyage from Henry VII of England, was one. Others, like Francis Drake on his voyage of 1578-9, were engaged in the opening up of trade, although exploration and plunder were subsidiary activities.

The epic wanderings of the Spanish into the interior were stimulated by the lure of supposed immense riches, like those already plundered from South America. The narratives of these amazingly tenacious explorers, such as de Soto and Coronado, are in sharp contrast to those written by the men who came to colonize and settle. At Fort Caroline, the French colony under Laudonniêre included the artist Le Moyne, and the many engravings of his paintings, reproduced with his own comments, provide a lively picture of Indian life and customs. From the English settlement of 1585 in Virginia come the paintings of John White and the accompanying notes of Thomas Harriot, settler, mathematician and scientist. But the hope of finding a shorter route to Cathay and the Spice Islands was so persistent that men like Frobisher and Davis made several voyages to the far north in search of a North-west Passage, and Henry Hudson died in that search.

The book is an Anglo-American partnership; the authors are authorities in their fields. Professor W.P. Cumming is the author of The Southeast in early maps and numerous other books and articles on colonial American history and cartography; as Guggenheim Fellow, he spent a year in European libraries and archives searching for and examining documents and maps relating to the colonial period of North America. The late Dr R.A. Skelton, former superintendent of the British Museum Map Room, long honorary secretary of the Hakluyt Society, editor of Imago Mundi, was the author of Explorers' Maps, The Vinland Map, and other works.

His sudden death occurred within a week of his final examination of the proofs of this work, and it ended a career which established his pre-eminence throughout the world in the history of exploration and cartography. Professor D.B. Quinn. Andrew Geddes and John Rankin Professor of Modern History at Liverpool University, is an authority on the history of discovery and has written numerous books and articles, including Sir Humphrey Gilbert and The Roanoke Voyages for the Hakluyt Society.

370 plates of which 75 are in colour

In preparation in the same format :
THE EXPLORATION OF NORTH AMERICA, c. 1634-1776

The spine, if possible, is scanned diagonally so as to capture it in one scan. As the book cannot be laid flat in this position the scanners light often produces glare in the image.
Book is too large to be scanned in one - this is a composite image and often the light scans from the opposite direction for each half. The spine, if possible, is scanned diagonally so as to capture it in one scan. As the book cannot be laid flat in this position the scanners light often produces glare in the image.
The spine, if possible, is scanned diagonally so as to capture it in one scan. As the book cannot be laid flat in this position the scanners light often produces glare in the image.

More 'EXPLORATION books: Place cursor over icon for brief details or click to go to page!

The Discovery and Exploration of North America to 1776. With a cartographical emphasis by such experts as W. P. Cumming, S. E. Hellier, D. B. Quinn and Glyndwr Williams,
MARINERS ARE WARNED: JOHN LORT STOKES AND HMS BEAGLE IN AUSTRALIA 1837-1843 by Marsden Hordern. Stokes circumnavigated Australia twice. Free to probe Australia's unknown coast, he was the last Royal Navy surveyor to hold such a roving commission. He discovered the Fitzroy, Albert and Flinders rivers and Port Darwin, and his most notable achievement was the charting of that graveyard of sailing ships—Bass Strait. He was the first naval surveyor in Australia to undertake considerable inland journeys as extensions of maritime work. More than a century later, twelve of his charts were still in use. LODESTONE and EVENING STAR: The seamen who mapped the world by Ian Cameron. A magnificent theme, magnificently handled. Within the confines of a single volume Ian Cameron unfolds the story of exploration by sea, from the voyages of the ancient Egyptians to the twentieth century. The Discovery and Exploration of North America to 1776. With a cartographical emphasis by such experts as W. P. Cumming, S. E. Hellier, D. B. Quinn and Glyndwr Williams,
WHEN THE POLE STAR SHONE- A history of exploration by Michael Langley: This book emphasises the human factor as it traces geographical exploration back to ancient times. A detailed account of early exploration reveals that Europeans have, for the most part, been rediscovering the earth, rather than unveiling it for the first time